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Click for a PDF copy of the flyer!

Click for a PDF copy of the flyer!

On April 23, 2016, the BFS will host a variety of tours for the Claremont Community in celebration of Earth Day 2016. Everyone is invited!

To ensure that all participants are provided a wonderful experience, tour size is limited and pre-registration is required for all tours. Tour options include:

  1. Bird-watching Tour
  2. General Tour of the BFS
  3. Wildflower Tour
  4. Family Science Tour, including:
    • Lizard Diversity & Ecology
    • Bird Ecology
    • Plant Ecology
    • Mammal Diversity and Ecology
  5. Night Family Tour
    • Night Sky
    • Insects of the Night

Please see the BFS Earth Day web page for details and links to online registration forms for each tour. Don’t delay – we expect tours to fill quickly!

BFS volunteer workdays will resume for the spring semester on Saturday, February 6. Although we had originally planned to start on January 16, the cold weather has slowed the growth of the annual weeds that occupy most of our spring workdays, and currently there are not enough weeds to pull! So relax for a few more weeks, and we hope to see you on February 6!

In the meantime, here are a few photos from the fall semester:

Cutting cattails.

Cutting cattails.

 

Clearing the 'bee island'.

Clearing the ‘bee island’.

 

Carrying cut cattails back to the boat landing.

Carrying cut cattails back to the boat landing.

 

Pulling horehound in the 'Neck'.

Pulling horehound in the ‘Neck’.

 

Piling cut cattails for collection.

Piling cut cattails for collection.

How do mites and snails that cope with extreme heat and desiccation in soil at the BFS? How can underwater robots track fish in 3D? How do ant species at the BFS differ among habitats, and how do they compare to ants found in adjacent suburbia?

The answers to these and many other questions can be found in the most recent crop of BFS theses and publications that we’ve just posted on the BFS website! They are listed below with links to abstracts and to full text (if it’s available online).

If you know of any publications or theses that we’ve missed, please let us know! We are also collecting reports and presentations on work done at the BFS, so if you have any of those, please pass them along!

Journal articles:

  • Wu, G. C., and J. C. Wright. 2015. Exceptional thermal tolerance and water resistance in the mite Paratarsotomus macropalpis (Erythracaridae) challenge prevailing explanations of physiological limits. Journal of Insect Physiology 82: 1-7 Abstract | HTML | PDF (Subscription required)
  • Staubus, W. J., E. S. Boyd, T. A. Adams, D. M. Spear, M. M. Dipman and W. M. Meyer III. 2015. Ant communities in native sage scrub, non-native grassland, and suburban habitats in Los Angeles County, USA: conservation implications. Journal of Insect Conservation 19: 669-680 Abstract | HTML | PDF
  • Lin, Y., H. Kastein, T. Peterson, C. White, C. G. Lowe, and C. M. Clark. 2014. A multi-AUV state estimator for determining the 3D position of tagged fish. Proceedings of the 2014 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2014): 3469-3475. Abstract | PDF

Dissertations & theses:

  • Dipman, Madison (2015) Factors driving early decomposition processes in low elevation habitat types of southern California. Bachelor of Arts, Pomona College, Biology. Advisor: Wallace Meyer. Abstract
  • Gormally, Brenna (2015) Comparing corticosterone concentrations in male Sceloporus occidentalis from urban and protected habitats. Bachelor of Arts, Pomona College, Biology. Advisor: Kristine Kaiser. Abstract
  • Hackenberger, Benjamin C. (2015). The San Antonio Wash: Addressing the gap between Claremont and Upland. Bachelor of Arts, Pomona College, Environmental Analysis. Readers: Char Miller, Lance Neckar, and John Bohn. Abstract | Thesis
  • Hernandez, Jessica (2015) The effects of urbanization on circulating testosterone levels in male Sceloporus occidentalis across urban and protected areas in the Los Angeles basin. Bachelor of Arts, Pomona College, Biology. Advisor: Kristine Kaiser. Abstract
  • Hollowell, Amanda C. (2015) Drivers of genotypic abundance and spatial spread in wild Bradyrhizobium. Doctor of Philosophy, University of California Riverside, Genetics, Genomics and Bioinformatics. Advisor: Joel Sachs. Abstract | Dissertation
  • Nuffer, Alex (2015) Relationship between soil nutrients and vegetation communities at the Robert J. Bernard Biological Field Station. Bachelor of Arts, Keck Science, Environmental Analysis. Advisor: Colin Robins. Abstract
  • Osborne, Rose (2015) Behavioral and physiological adaptations to avoid desiccation, starvation, and lethally high temperatures during estivation in the land snail Helminthoglypta tudiculata. Bachelor of Arts, Pomona College, Biology. Advisor: Jonathan Wright. Abstract
  • Stroutsos, Mia (2015) Environmental education curricula in the Inland Empire: ethnographic accounts of innovative schooling. Bachelor of Arts, Pitzer College, Anthropology and Environmental Analysis. Advisor: Claudia Strauss. Abstract

We’ve recently updated the BFS Plant List. Here are the changes:

NEW ADDITIONS:

Eleven new plants have been added to the list – five natives, four non-natives, and two California native that appear to have been planted – it seems that someone has been seeding the parkway with wildflowers! They new additions are:

Sunflower Family (Asteraceae):

  • Chaenactis artemisiifolia (White Pincushion) – native. A single plant was spotted growing in the upper Neck.

    White Pincushion (Chaenactis artemisiifolia) growing in the 'Neck'. Nancy Hamlett.

    White Pincushion (Chaenactis artemisiifolia) growing in the ‘Neck’. ©Nancy Hamlett.

  • Erigeron foliosus var. foliosus (Leafy Fleabane) – native. A number of these are growing in two patches in the East Field burn area.

    Leafy Fleabane (Erigeron foliosus var. foliosus) growing in the East Field. Nancy Hamlett.

    Leafy Fleabane (Erigeron foliosus var. foliosus) growing in the East Field. ©Nancy Hamlett.

  • Dimorphotheca sinuata (African Daisy) – non-native. This southern African native is widely grown as an ornamental and has naturalized in Southern California and Arizona. At the BFS, several plants were spotted in the burn area west of the drive.

    African Daisy (Dimorphotheca sinuata) growing amid Phacelia distans in the burn area just west of the entry drive. Nancy Hamlett.

    African Daisy (Dimorphotheca sinuata) growing amid Phacelia distans in the burn area just west of the entry drive. ©Nancy Hamlett.

Borage Family (Boraginaceae)

  • Emmenanthe penduliflora var. penduliflora (Whispering Bells) – native. A single plant of this charming Phacelia relative was spotted in the sage scrub southeast of pHake Lake.
    Whispering Bells (Emmenanthe penduliflora) growing southeast of pHake Lake. Nancy Hamlett.

    Whispering Bells (Emmenanthe penduliflora var. penduliflora) growing southeast of pHake Lake. ©Nancy Hamlett.

  • Phacelia campanularia (Desert Bluebells) – CA native, but not endemic to the BFS. Spotted in the parkway where it was likely seeded as part of a wildflower mix.

    Desert Bluebells (Phacelia campanularia) growing in the Mills Ave parkway. Nancy Hamlett.

    Desert Bluebells (Phacelia campanularia) growing in the Mills Ave parkway. ©Nancy Hamlett.

  • Phacelia cicutaria var. hispida (Caterpillar Phacelia) – native. Several plants were growing next to the trail on the south side of pHake Lake. Although recorded at other sites in Claremont, this species had not previously been reported at the BFS.

    Caterpillar Phacelia (Phacelia cicutaria var. hispida) growing by the path on the south side of the lake. Nancy Hamlett.

    Caterpillar Phacelia (Phacelia cicutaria var. hispida) growing by the path on the south side of the lake. ©Nancy Hamlett.

Mustard Family (Brassicaceae)

  • Eruca vesicaria ssp. sativa (Garden Rocket) – non-native. Salad anyone? Several plants of Garden Rocket, also known as arugula, appeared behind the infirmary. This Mediterranean native has naturalized in Southern California, but is not considered invasive.

    Garden Rocket (Eruca vesicaria ssp. sativa) growing behind the infirmary. Nancy Hamlett.

    Garden Rocket (Eruca vesicaria ssp. sativa) growing behind the infirmary. ©Nancy Hamlett.

Goosefoot Family (Chenopodiaceae)

    Several plants of two species known as Russian Thistle or tumbleweed were spotted in the East Field. Besides being quite prickly, these Eurasian natives contain high levels of toxic oxalates and serve as an alternate host for a leaf-hopper that carries a virus of important agricultural crops. Although the California Invasive Plant Council considers their impact “Limited”, we plan to remove them whenever we spot them.

  • Salsola australis (Russian Thistle) – non-native
    Russian Thistle (Salsola australis) near Mills Avenue in the East Field. Nancy Hamlett.

    Russian Thistle (Salsola australis) near Mills Avenue in the East Field. ©Nancy Hamlett.

  • Salsola tragus (Russian Thistle) – non-native
    Russian Thistle (Salsola tragus) near Mills Avenue in the East Field. Nancy Hamlett.

    Russian Thistle (Salsola tragus) near Mills Avenue in the East Field. ©Nancy Hamlett.

Legume (Bean & Pea) Family (Fabaceae)

  • Lupinus succulentus (Arroyo Lupine) – native. Several plants of Arroyo Lupine appeared behind the field house.

    Arroyo Lupine (Lupinus succulentus) growing behind the field house. Nancy Hamlett.

    Arroyo Lupine (Lupinus succulentus) growing behind the field house. ©Nancy Hamlett.

  • Lupinus nanus (Sky Lupine) – CA native, but not endemic to the BFS Like P. campanularia, L. nanus was spotted in the parkway where, like the Desert Bluebells, it was likely seeded as part of a wildflower mix.

    Sky Lupine (Lupinus nanus) growing in the Foothill Blvd Parkway. Nancy Hamlett.

    Sky Lupine (Lupinus nanus) growing in the Foothill Blvd Parkway. ©Nancy Hamlett.

NAME CHANGES:

Advances in plant phylogeny – largely through the newer molecular techniquest – have led to new understanding of the relationships of many plant species and, in some cases, to changes in taxonom. Here are the recent name changes of BFS plants:

  • Chamaesyce albomarginata to Euphorbia albomarginata
  • Chamaesyce serpyllifolia to Euphorbia serpyllifolia
  • Trifolium gracilentum var. gracilentum to Trifolium gracilentum
  • Juglans californica var. californica to Juglans californica
  • Calandrinia ciliata to Calandrinia menziesii
  • Anagallis arvensis to Lysimachia arvensis
  • Phoradendron serotinum ssp. macrophyllum to Phoradendron leucarpum ssp. macrophyllum

SUBTRACTIONS:

We have not been able to confirm the following plants as being present on the BFS; consequently, we’ve moved them to the list of “Unconfirmed plant reports”. If you spot any of these at the BFS, please let us know, and we’ll document them and restore them to the main plant list:

  • Baccharis salicina (Emory Baccharis)
  • Hazardia squarrosa (Saw-toothed Goldenbush)
  • Isocoma menziesii (Coastal Goldenbush, Menzie’s Goldenbush)
  • Epilobium canum ssp. canum (California Fuchsia)
  • Eulobus californicus (Mustard Evening-Primrose)
  • Navarretia hamata (Hooked Navarretia)

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The BFS invert list has just undergone a major update! Since Summer 2009, when we posted our first draft of the BFS Invertebrate List with 169 taxa, we have periodically been adding to the list, and this addition is big! Since our last update, we have added 170 new taxa – more than on the original list, bringing the total on the list to more than 600. The new taxa include 1 slug, 1 centipede, 1 millipede, 53 spiders, 1 mite, 1 damselfly, 1 dragonfly, 1 earwig, 13 bugs, 1 antlion, 12 beetles, 23 flies, 8 butterflies, 15 moths, 17 ants, 11 bees, 10 wasps, and 32 new invertebrate families! A complete list of the new taxa is at the end of this post.

Some families were known to be at the BFS (e.g., House Flies, Mosquitos!), but none had been officially recorded on the list. Some of the taxa had also been previously observed but not identified to species (e.g., Centris pallida and Anthophora californica).

The taxa that are represent new observations come from a variety of source, including pitfall traps, sweep-netting, regular visual/photographic insect surveys, and casual observations. (See ‘Acknowledgements’ below for details.)

A few name changes:
Besides the new additions, the list also reflects a few recent name changes:

  • Papilio rumiko – Western Giant Swallowtail (previously listed as Papilio cresphontes Giant Swallowtail
    Western Giant Swallowtail (Papilio rumiko) at pHake Lake. Nancy Hamlett.

    Western Giant Swallowtail (Papilio rumiko) at pHake Lake. ©Nancy Hamlett.


    The butterflies that had been called Papilio cresphontes (Giant Swallowtail) have actually been found to belong to two species (Shiraiwa et al. 2014). The species found in the eastern US remains P. cresphontes, and the western species is now called P. rumiko. The two species overlap only in Texas.
  • Anthophora curta (previously listed as A. squammulosa)
    Anthophora curta on Douglas' Threadleaf Ragword (Senecio flaccidus var. douglasii). Nancy Hamlett.

    Anthophora curta on Douglas’ Threadleaf Ragword (Senecio flaccidus var. douglasii). ©Nancy Hamlett.


    A. curta had been considered conspecific with A. squammulosa, but Orr et al. (2014) showed that the two are clearly differentiated by both morphological characters and geographic distribution. On both counts, ours are clearly A. curta.
  • Callophrys dumetorum – Lotus Hairstreak (previously listed as C. affinis – Western Green Hairstreak)
    Lotus Hairstreak (Callophrys dumetorum) on Deerweed (Acmispon glaber). Nancy Hamlett.

    Lotus Hairstreak (Callophrys dumetorum) on Deerweed (Acmispon glaber). ©Nancy Hamlett.


    In 2012, the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature issued an opinion that green hairstreaks previously listed as C. perplexa (which is what we should have been calling ours) are now called C. dumetorum. The more northern coastal green hairstreaks previously called C. dumetorum are now C. viridis. Our BFS species had been confirmed as C. dumetorum.

Acknowledgments:
A lot of folks contributed to this update! BFS Director Marty Meyer’s research group, including Pomona students Weston Staubus, Dakota Spear, Tessa Adams, Elise Boyd, Clayton Ziemke Madison Dipman, and Ashish Streatfield collected and identified spiders and ants collected in pitfall traps placed in various BFS habitats. Brandon Watts from Cal Poly Pomona (advisor Joan Leong) collected insects by sweep-netting. The San Gabriel Valley Mosquito & Vector Control District shared their mosquito sightings from the BFS. Jonathan Wright, Hartmut Wisch, Nancy Hamlett, Ben Stapp, and Richard Rojo shared observations, photographed insects, and collected specimens.

We are also very grateful to the many additional folks who helped with identification, including Kimberly Franklin, University of Arizona; Sandra Brantley, University of New Mexico; Doug Yanega, UC Riverside Entomology Museum; Jim Hogue, Cal State Northridge Biology Department; Molly Rightmyer Gee, San Diego Natural History Museum; Andy Hamilton, Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids and Nematodes; John Ascher, National University of Singapore and American Museum of Natural History; Andy Calderwood, Ventura County Agricultural Commissioner’s Office; David Furguson, Rio Grande Botanic Garden; Ken Davenport, Josiah Gilbert, and Robert Martin at Butterflies and Moths of North America; and all the other folks at BugGuide.

The complete list of new additions:
Here is the complete list of new additions with some photos. Additional photos are available in the BFS Photo Database and are linked to the BFS invert list.

PHYLUM MOLLUSCA

  • Class Gastropoda (Slugs & Snails)
    • Order Stylommatophora
      • Family Milacidae (Terrestrial Slugs)
        • Milax gagates (Jet Greenhouse Slug)

PHYLUM ARTHROPODA

  • Class Chilopoda (Centipedes)
    • Order Lithobiomorpha (Stone Centipedes – new order
      • Family Lithobiidae – new family
        • Lithobius forficatus (a stone centipede)
          A stone centipede, Lithobius forficatus, found under a cover board near the "old toad pond". Nancy Hamlett.

          A stone centipede, Lithobius forficatus, found under a cover board near the “old toad pond”. ©Nancy Hamlett.

  • Class Diplopoda (Millipedes)
    • Order Spirobolida
      • Family Atopetholidae – new family
        • Unidentified sp. (a spirobolid millipede)
  • Class Arachnida (Spiders, scorpions, mites, & their relatives)
    • Order Araneae (Spiders)
      • Family Agelenidae (Funnel Weavers)
        • Ageleninae, unidentified sp. (a funnel web spider)
          A funnel web spider, Subfamily  Ageleninae, in her funnel web in the East Field burn area. Nancy Hamlett

          A funnel web spider, Subfamily Ageleninae, in her funnel web in the East Field burn area. ©Nancy Hamlett

        • Calilena restricta (a funnel web spider)
        • Tegenaria pagana (a funnel web spider)
      • Family Amaurobiidae (Hacklemesh Weavers) – new family
        • Amaurobius latescens (a hacklemesh weaver)
      • Family Araneidae (Orb Weavers)
        • Neoscona oaxacensis (Western Spotted Orbweaver)
      • Family Corinnidae (Antmimics and Ground Sac Spiders) – new family
        • Meriola californica
        • Phrurotimpus mateonus
      • Family Cyrtaucheniidae (Wafer Trapdoor Spiders) – new family
        • Aptostichus atomarius (San Bernardino Hills Trapdoor Spider)
      • Family Dictynidae (Mesh Web Weavers) – new family
        • Blabomma grandis (a mesh web weaver)
        • Cicurina sp. 1 (a mesh web weaver)
        • Emblyna olympiana (a mesh web weaver)
        • Yorima angelica (a mesh web weaver)
      • Family Gnaphosidae (Ground Spiders) – new family
        • Callilepsis eremella (a ground spider)
        • Callilepsis gosoga (a ground spider)
        • Drassodes angulus (a ground spider)
        • Drassodes saccatus (a ground spider)
        • Drassyllus insularis (a ground spider)
        • Drassylus lamprus (a ground spider)
        • Drassylus proclesis (a ground spider)
        • Gnaphosa californica (a ground spider)
        • Haplodrassus maculatus (a ground spider)
        • Haplodrassus signifer (a ground spider)
        • Micaria deserticola (a ground spider)
        • Micaria jeanae (a ground spider)
        • Scopoides nesiotes (a ground spider)
        • Trachyzelotes barbatus (a ground spider)
        • Urozelotes rusticus (a ground spider)
        • Zelotes gynethus (a ground spider)
        • Zelotes nilicola (a ground spider)
      • Family Hahniidae (Dwarf Sheet Spiders) – new family
        • Neoantistea agilis (a dwarf sheet spider)
      • Family Linyphiidae (Sheetweb and Dwarf Spiders) – new family
        • Agyneta sp. (a sheetweb spider)
        • Spirembolus praelongus (a dwarf spider)
        • Spirembolus sp. 1 (a dwarf spider)
        • Wubana drassoides (a sheetweb spider)
        • Wubana suprema (a sheetweb spider)
      • Family Liocranidae (Liocranid Sac Spiders) – new family
        • Apostenus californicus (a liocranid sac spider)
      • Family Lycosidae (Wolf Spiders)
        • Alopecosa kochi (a wolf spider)
        • Schizocosa mccooki (a wolf spider)
      • Family Oecobiidae (Wall Spiders) – new family
        • Oecobius navus (Wall Spider)
      • Family Philodromidae (Running Crab Spiders) – new family
        • Titanebo californicus (a running crab spider)
      • Family Pholcidae (Cellar Spiders) – new family
        • Psilochorus utahensis (a cellar spider)
      • Family Phrurolithidae – new family
        • Phrurolithus duncani
        • Neozimiris sp. 1
      • Family Salticidae (Jumping Spiders)
        • Anasaitis canosa (Twinflagged Jumping Spider)
        • Chalcoscirtus diminutus (a jumping spider)
        • Habronattus sp. 1 (a jumping spider)
        • Salticidae sp. 2 (a jumping spider)
      • Family Tengellidae (Tengellid Spiders) – new family
        • Socalchemmis dolichopus (a tengellid spider)
      • Family Theridiidae (Cobweb Spiders)
        • Asagena fulva (a cobweb spider)
        • Enoplognatha marmorata (Marbled Cobweb Spider)
        • Theridion californicum (a cobweb spider)
      • Family Thomasidae (Crab Spiders)
        • Xysticus californicus (a ground crab spider)
        • Xysticus montanensis (a ground crab spider)
    • Subclass Acari (Mites & ticks)
      • Family Anystidae – new family
        • Paratarsotomus macropalpis (a mite)
  • Class Insecta (Insects)
    • Order Odonata (Dragonflies & damselflies)
      • Suborder Zygoptera (Damselflies)
        • Enallagma civile (Familiar Bluet)
          A male Familiar Bluet, Enallagma civile, on a reed at pHake Lake. Nancy Hamlett.

          A male Familiar Bluet, Enallagma civile, on a reed at pHake Lake. ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Suborder Anisoptera (Dragonflies)
        • Pantala sp (a rainpool glider)
    • Order Dermaptera (Earwigs)
      • Family Forficulidae
        • Forficula auricularia (European Earwig)
    • Order Hemiptera (True bugs)
      • Family Alydidae (Broad-headed Bugs) – new family
        • Tollius sp. (a broad-headed bug)
      • Family Cicadellidae (Leafhoppers)
        • Euscelis variegatus (a leafhopper)
        • Exitianus exitiosus (Gray Lawn Leafhopper)
          A leafhopper, Exitianus exitiosus, in a recently burned area of recovering coastal sage scrub in the East Field. Nancy Hamlett.

          A leafhopper, Exitianus exitiosus, in a recently burned area of recovering coastal sage scrub in the East Field. ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Cicadidae (Cicadas)
        • Okanagana sp. (a cicada)
          A molt of a cicada, Okagana sp., on Pine-Bush. Nancy Hamlett.

          A molt of a cicada, Okanagana sp., on Pine-Bush. ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Clastopteridae (Spittlebugs) – new family
        • Clastoptera sp. (a spittlebug)
      • Family Coreidae (Leaffooted Bugs)
        • Catorhintha apicalis (a leaffooted bug)
      • Family Geocoridae (Big-eyed Bugs) – new family
        • Geocoris sp. (Big-eyed Bug)
      • Family Lygaeidae (Seed Bugs)
        • Melanopleurus belfragei (Redcoat Seed Bug)
      • Family Pentatomidae (Stink Bugs)
        • Chlorochroa sayi (Say’s Stink Bug)
        • Thyanta custator (Red-shouldered Stink Bug)
      • Family Reduviidae (Assassin Bugs)
        • Phymata pacifica (Pacific Ambush Bug)
          A Pacific Ambush Bug, Phymata pacifica, on Scale-Broom (Lepidospartum squamatum). Nancy Hamlett.

          A Pacific Ambush Bug, Phymata pacifica, on Scale-Broom (Lepidospartum squamatum). ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Zelus tetracanthus (Four Spurred Assassin Bug)
      • Family Rhopalidae (Scentless Plant Bugs)
        • Liorhyssus hyalinus (a scentless plant bug)
    • Order Neuroptera (Antlions, Lacewings, and Allies)
      • Family Myrmeleontidae (Antlions)
        • Unidentified antlion (not Brachynemurus)
    • Order Coleoptera (Beetles)
      • Family Chrysomelidae (Leaf Beetles)
        • Hemiglyptus basalis (a leaf beetle)
          A flea beetle, Hemiglyptus basalis, on young Yerba Santa sprouting in the recently burned area west of the entry drive. Nancy Hamlett.

          A flea beetle, Hemiglyptus basalis, on young Yerba Santa sprouting in the recently burned area west of the entry drive. ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Lema daturaphila (Three-lined Potato Beetle)
      • Family Coccinellidae (Lady Beetles)
        • Hyperaspis trifurcata (Trident Lady Beetle)
          A Trident Lady Beetle (Hyperaspis trifurcata) on Prickly-Pear. Nancy Hamlett.

          A Trident Lady Beetle (Hyperaspis trifurcata) on Prickly-Pear. ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Carabidae (Ground Beetles)
        • Calosoma semilaeve (Black Calosoma)
      • Family Dascillidae (Soft-bodied Plant Beetles)
        • Anorus piceus (a soft-bodied plant beetle)
      • Family Melyridae (Soft-winged Flower Beetles)
        • Tanaops sp. (a soft-winged flower beetle)
      • Family Mycetophagidae (Hairy Fungus Beetles) – new family
        • Unidentified sp., possibly Litargus (a hairy fungus beetle)
      • Family Nitidulidae (Sap-feeding Beetles) – new family
        • Nitops pallipennis (a sap-feeding beetle)
      • Family Oedemeridae (False Blister Beetles) – new family
        • Asclera excavata (a false blister beetle)
          A false blister beetle, Asclera excavata, on Jimson Weed (Datura wrightii). Nancy Hamlett.

          A false blister beetle, Asclera excavata, on Jimson Weed (Datura wrightii). ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Staphylinidae (Rove Beetles) – new family
        • Subfamily Aleocharinae (a rove beetle)
      • Family Tenebrionidae (Darkling Beetles)
        • Metoponium sp. (a darkling beetle)
          A darkling beetle, Metoponium sp., collected from under the burned bark of a Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolia). Nancy Hamlett.

          A darkling beetle, Metoponium sp., collected from under the burned bark of a Toyon (Heteromeles arbutifolia). ©Nancy Hamlett.

    • Order Diptera (Flies)
      • Family Agromyzidae (Leaf Miner Flies) – new family
        • Liriomyza sp. (likely L. sativae or L. trifolii) (a leaf miner fly)
          A leaf-miner fly, Liriomyza sp., on Castor Bean. Nancy Hamlett.

          A leaf-miner fly, Liriomyza sp., on Castor Bean (Ricinus communis) in the East Field burn area. ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Apioceridae (Flower-loving Flies) – new family
        • Apiocera sp. (a flower-loving fly)
          A male flower-loving fly, Apiocera sp., in the fire road north of the lake. Nancy Hamlett.

          A male flower-loving fly, Apiocera sp., in the fire road north of the lake. ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Asilidae (Robber Flies)
        • Cophura sp. (ID tentative) (a robber fly)
        • Efferia albibarbis (a robber fly)
      • Family Bombyliidae (Bee Flies)
        • Aphoebantus interruptus (a bee fly)
        • Bombylius major (Greater Bee Fly)
          A Greater Bee Fly, Bombylius major, on a sandy fire road in the 'Neck'. Nancy Hamlett.

          A Greater Bee Fly, Bombylius major, on a sandy fire road in the ‘Neck’. ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Poecilognathus sp. (a bee fly)
      • Family Calliphoridae (Blow Flies)
        • Lucilia sp. (a blow fly)
          A blow fly, Lucilia sp. on California Buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum var. foliolosum). Nancy Hamlett.

          A blow fly, Lucilia sp. on California Buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum var. foliolosum). ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Chrysomya megacephala (a hairy maggot blow fly)
      • Family Chironomidae (Midges)
        • Subfamily Tanypodinae (a midge)
      • Family Chloropidae (Frit Flies) – new family
        • Unidentified sp. (a frit fly)
      • Family Culicidae (Mosquitoes) – new family
        • Anopheles freeborni (Western Malaria Mosquito) (ID probable, need to examine with microscope)
        • Culex erythrothorax (Tule Mosquito)
        • Culex quinquefasciatus (Southern House Mosquito)
        • Ochlerotatus sierrensis (Western Treehole Mosquito)
      • Family Milichiidae (Freeloader Flies) – new family
        • Unidentified black freeloader fly
      • Family Muscidae (House Flies and kin) – new family
        • Unidentified aquatic species
      • Family Stratiomyidae (Soldier Flies)
        • Hermetia sp. (a soldier fly)
      • Family Syrphidae (Hover Flies)
        • Nausigaster unimaculata (a hover fly)
          A syrphid fly, Nausigaster unimaculata, on a dead branch of Scale-Broom (Lepidospartum squamatum). Nancy Hamlett.

          A syrphid fly, Nausigaster unimaculata, on a dead branch of Scale-Broom (Lepidospartum squamatum). ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Tachinidae (Tachinid Flies)
        • Gymnosoma sp. (a tachinid fly)
      • Family Tephritidae (Fruit Flies)
        • Ceratitis capitata (Mediterranean Fruit Fly)
      • Family Therevidae (Stiletto Flies) – new family
        • Nebritus pellucidus (a stiletto fly)
      • Family Ulidiidae (Picture-winged Flies)
        • Diacrita costalis (a picture-winged fly)
    • Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies & moths) – Butterflies:
      • Family Hesperiidae (Skippers)
        • Erynnis propertius (Propertius Duskywing)
        • Poanes melane (Umber Skipper)
      • Family Lycaenidae (Blues, Coppers, Hairstreaks, Harvesters)
        • Celastrina echo echo (Pacific Azure)
        • Echinargus isola (Reakirt’s Blue)
          Reakirt's Blue (Echinargus isola) on California Buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum var. foliolosum). Nancy Hamlett.

          Reakirt’s Blue (Echinargus isola) on California Buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum var. foliolosum). ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Hemiargus ceraunus (Ceraunus Blue)
        • Satyrium auretorum (Gold-hunter’s Hairstreak)
      • Family Nymphalidae (Brushfooted Butterflies)
        • Danaus gilippus (Queen)
          A Queen butterfly, Danaus gillippus, on Scale-Broom (Lepidospartum squamatum) in the 'Neck'. Nancy Hamlett.

          A Queen butterfly, Danaus gillippus, on on Scale-Broom (Lepidospartum squamatum) in the ‘Neck’. ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Papilionidae (Swallowtails, Parnassians)
        • Papilio polyxenes coloro (Desert Black Swallowtail)
          A Desert Black Swallowtail, Papilio polyxenes coloro, in the East Field.  This sighting is only the second time this species has been reported in Los Angeles County. Nancy Hamlett.

          A Desert Black Swallowtail, Papilio polyxenes coloro, in the East Field. This sighting is only the second time this species has been reported in Los Angeles County. ©Nancy Hamlett.

    • Order Lepidoptera (Butterflies & moths) – Moths:
      • Family Crambidae (Crambid Snout Moths) – new family
        • Agriphila attenuatus (a crambid snout moth)
        • Crambus sperryellus (a crambid snout moth)
          A crambid snout moth, Crambus sperryellus, in the East Field. Nancy Hamlett.

          A crambid snout moth, Crambus sperryellus, in the East Field. ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Nomophila nearctica (Lucerne Moth)
        • Pyrausta laticlavia (Southern Purple Mint Moth)
      • Family Erebidae
        • Catocala junctura (Joined Underwing)
      • Family Geometridae (Geometrid Moths)
        • Neoterpes edwardsata (a geometrid moth)
        • Plataea californiaria (a geometrid moth)
        • Pero macdunnoughi (McDunnough’s Pero)
      • Family Noctuidae (Owlet Moths)
        • Euxoa auxiliaries (Army Cutworm Moth)
        • Spodoptera exigua (Small Mottled Willow Moth)
      • Family Plutellidae – new family
        • Plutella xylostella (Diamondback Moth)
          A Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella, on California Brittlebush (Encelia californica). Nancy Hamlett.

          A Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella, on California Brittlebush (Encelia californica). ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Pyralidae (Pyralid Moths) – new family
        • Elasmopalpus lignosellus (Lesser Cornstalk Borer)
          A Lesser Cornstalk Borer, Elasmopalpus lignosellus, on brome in the recently burned portion of the East Field. Nancy Hamlett.

          A Lesser Cornstalk Borer, Elasmopalpus lignosellus, on brome in the recently burned portion of the East Field. ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Sesiidae (Clearwing Moths)
        • Melittia gloriosa (Glorious Squash Vine Borer)
        • Synanthedon polygoni (Buckwheat Root Borer)
      • Family Sphingidae (Sphinx Moths)
        • Hyles lineata (White-lined Sphinx)
          A caterpillar of the White-line Sphinx Moth, Hyles lineata, on one of its host plants, California Four O'Clocks (Mirabilis laevis var. crassifolia) in the recently burned area in the East Field. Nancy Hamlett.

          A caterpillar of the White-line Sphinx Moth, Hyles lineata, on one of its host plants, California Four O’Clocks (Mirabilis laevis var. crassifolia) in the recently burned area in the East Field. ©Nancy Hamlett.

    • Order Hymenoptera (Ants, bees, & wasps) – Ants
      • Family Formicidae (Ants)
        • Brachymyrmex depilis
        • Dorymyrmex insanus
        • Forelius mccooki (an odorous ant)
        • Messor andrei (a smooth harvester ant)
        • Messor chamberlini (a smooth harvester ant)
        • Myrmecocystus mimicus (a honeypot ant)
        • Myrmecocystus testaceus (a honeypot ant)
        • Myrmecocystus wheeleri (a honeypot ant)
          A honeypot ant, Myrmecocystus wheeleri, on California Buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum var. foliolosum). Nancy Hamlett.

          A honeypot ant, Myrmecocystus wheeleri, on California Buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum var. foliolosum). ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Pheidole cerebrosior (a big-headed ant)
        • Pheidole hyatti (a big-headed ant)
        • Pheidole pilifera (a big-headed ant)
        • Prenolepis imparis (False Honey Ant)
          A false honeypot ant, Prenolespis imparis, underneath bark sloughing off a burned Blue Elderberry (Sambucus nigra ssp. caerulea) in the East Field. Nancy Hamlett.

          A false honeypot ant, Prenolespis imparis, underneath bark sloughing off a burned Blue Elderberry (Sambucus nigra ssp. caerulea) in the East Field. ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Solenopsis xyloni Southern Fire Ant
        • Stenamma MGB101#
        • Stenamma MGB102#
        • Temnothorax andrei (an acorn ant)
        • Temnothorax nevadensis (an acorn ant)
    • Order Hymenoptera (Ants, bees, & wasps) – Bees
      • Family Andrenidae (Mining Bees)
        • Andrena palpalis (a mining bee)
        • Perdita rhois (a mining bee)
      • Family Apidae (Cuckoo, Carpenter, Digger, Bumble, & Honey Bees)
        • Anthophora californica (California Anthophora)

          A female California Anthophora (Anthophora californica) on Royal Penstemon (Penstemon spectabilis). Nancy Hamlett.

          A female California Anthophora (Anthophora californica) on Royal Penstemon (Penstemon spectabilis). ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Centris pallida (Pallid Bee)
        • Diadasia bituberculata (a chimney bee)
        • Melissodes sp. (a long-horned bee)
        • Melissodes (Melissodes) sp. (a long-horned bee)
        • Melecta separata callura (a cuckoo bee)
      • Family Halictidae (Sweat Bees)
        • Halictus ligatus (a sweat bee)
        • Halictus tripartitus (a sweat bee)
      • Family Megachilidae (Mining Bees)
        • Chelostoma (Subgenus Foveosmia) (an osmiine bee)
    • Order Hymenoptera (Ants, bees, & wasps) – Wasps
      • Family Bethylidae – new family
        • Goniozus sp. (a parasitic wasp)
          A parasitoid wasp, Goniozus sp. on Dove Weed (Croton setigerus). Nancy Hamlett.

          A parasitoid wasp, Goniozus sp. on Dove Weed (Croton setigerus). ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Crabronidae (Bee Wolves & Sand Wasps)
        • Subtribe Crabronina (a square-headed wasp)
        • Subtribe Gorytina (a sand wasp)
        • Subtribe Gastrosericina (a square-headed wasp)
      • Family Ichneumonidae (Ichneumon Wasps)
        • Subfamily Ophioninae (an ichneumon wasp)
      • Family Leucospidae (Leucospid Wasps) – new family
        • Leucospis affinis (a leucospid wasp)
          A chalcid wasp, Leucospis affinis, on Cobwebby Thistle (Cirsium occidentale var. occidentale). Nancy Hamlett.

          A chalcid wasp, Leucospis affinis, on Cobwebby Thistle (Cirsium occidentale var. occidentale). ©Nancy Hamlett.

      • Family Pompilidae (Spider Wasps)
        • Aporus hirsutus (a spider wasp)
          A spider wasp, Aporus hirsutus, on buckwheat. Nancy Hamlett.

          A spider wasp, Aporus hirsutus, on buckwheat. ©Nancy Hamlett.

        • Tachypompilus unicolor (a spider wasp)
      • Family Sphecidae (Thread-waisted Wasps)
        • Tribe Bembcini (Sand Wasps)
          A sand wasp, Tribe Bembicini. Nancy Hamlett.

          A sand wasp, Tribe Bembicini, digging in the sand in the burn area west of the drive. ©Nancy Hamlett.

References:

  • Kojiro Shiraiwa, Qian Cong, Nick V. Grishin. 2014. A new Heraclides swallowtail (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) from North America is recognized by the pattern on its neck. ZooKeys 468: 85-135.
  • M Orr, J Koch, T Griswold, J Pitt. 2014.Taxonomic utility of environmental niche models for species distinction: A case study in Anthophora (Heliophila)(Hymenoptera: Apidae). Zootaxa 3846 (3): 411–429.
  • OPINION 2291 (Case 3524) Thecla dumetorum Boisduval, 1852 (currently Callophrys dumetorum), proposed neotype; and Thecla sheridonii Carpenter, 1877 (currently C. sheridanii) (Lepidoptera, LYCAENIDAE): current usage and names conserved. 2012. Bulletin of Zoological Nomenclature 69: 69-71. A summary is available in the News of the Lepidopterists’ Society, Vol. 54, No. 2, Summer 2012, p. 40.

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On April 25, 2015, the BFS will host a variety of tours for the Claremont Community in celebration of Earth Day 2015. Everyone is invited!

A group watching birds during the first annual BFS Earth Day Celebration

A group watching birds last year during the first annual BFS Earth Day Celebration. ©Nina Karnovsky.

To ensure that all participants are provided a wonderful experience, tour size is limited and pre-registration is required for all tours. Tour options include:

  1. Bird-watching Tour
  2. General Tour of the BFS
  3. Wildflower Tour
  4. “Claremont Natives for your Garden” Tour
  5. Family Science Tour, including:
    • Lizard Diversity & Ecology
    • Soil Science
    • Bird Ecology
    • Robotics for Bio-monitoring
    • Mammal Diversity and Ecology
  6. Night Family Tour
    • Night Sky
    • Insects of the Night
    • Bat Surveys

Please see the BFS Earth Day web page for details and links to online registration forms for each tour. Don’t delay – we expect tours to fill quickly!

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664

Hot off the presses – a rapid color guide to the
Butterflies of the Bernard Field Station“!

Produced in conjunction with the Field Museum, Chicago, who developed the Rapid Color Guide format, the guide is illustrated with live photos (most taken at the BFS) of all butterflies that have been documented at the BFS, with brief descriptions of key field marks as well as host plants for each species. This is a great resources for students wanting to study butterflies at the BFS!

We are very grateful to Rebecca Collings of the Field Museum for providing the Guide template and assisting us with the production, and to Jonathan Wright, Hartmut Wisch, and Tad Beckman for contributing photographs (in addition to myself). We also thank Nick Grishin and Jim P. Brock of Butterflies of America and John Pickering and Bobby Hattaway of DiscoverLife.org for permission to use their photos of the uppersides of the sulphur butterflies.

You can download the Guide as a PDF from either the BFS website or the Field Museum website.

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At the Urban Soil Summit held February 24-25 at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, BFS Director Wallace (Marty) Meyer participated in a panel discussion a “The Watershed Story: How does living soil affect ecosystem and watershed function?” in which he shared his knowledge of carbon storage in native and disturbed habitats gained from his research at the BFS. Here’s a video made for the Summit, in which Marty introduces himself, the BFS, and his research on carbon storage in sage scrub:

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The kiosk that normally greets visitors to the BFS with an informative map and an overview of rules for BFS was destroyed in the Foothill Fire, but we’re happy to report that it has now been restored.

Matt Krupnick constructed the original kiosk in 1994 for his Eagle Scout project. Over the years, the kiosk underwent occasional refurbishing. Here is then-BFS Director Gene Fowler in 2001 with the freshly repaired and repainted kiosk sporting the first version of our current entry sign:

BFS Director Gene Fowler with the first version of the entry sign, September 2001. Nancy Hamlett.

BFS Director Gene Fowler with the first version of the entry sign, September 2001. ©Nancy Hamlett.

Unfortunately, in September 2013 the kiosk rather dramatically succumbed to the Foothill Fire:

The kiosk burning in the Foothill Fire, September 11, 2013. Steven Felschundneff. Used with permission of the Claremont Courier.

The kiosk burning in the Foothill Fire, September 11, 2013. ©Steven Felschundneff. Used with permission of the Claremont Courier.

Finally this fall we were able to hire A1 Construction to build a replacement kiosk, and the last week in November we installed a new sign:

BFS Director Wallace (Marty) Meyer by the newly restored kiosk and sign.  Nancy Hamlett.

BFS Director Wallace (Marty) Meyer by the newly restored kiosk and sign. ©Nancy Hamlett.

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This past Saturday’s volunteer workday was the last day of cattail removal for this year. The warm November weather enabled us to get in enough workdays to do the necessary clearing despite the earlier spate of canceled workdays.

The volunteers concentrated on the area near and around the little island in the northeast corner of pHake Lake. This is a favorite spot for collecting water samples and observing waterfowl and other wildlife, so clearing this area is really helpful for classes and researchers.

Here are some of the volunteers adding the last to the cattails to our giant pile:

Volunteers Mike Tschudi and Tim Cox add the last of the cattails to the giant pile. Nancy Hamlett.

Volunteers Mike Tschudi and Tim Cox add the last of the cattails to the giant pile. ©Nancy Hamlett.

And here are some before and after photos:

Before: Little island is completely obscured by cattails and bulrushes. Nancy Hamlett.

Before: The little island is completely obscured by cattails and bulrushes. ©Nancy Hamlett.

After: Lake can be accessed from the island and the shore. Nancy Hamlett.

After: The lake can be accessed from the island and the shore. ©Nancy Hamlett.

 

Before: View from the island in September, before cattail removal. Nancy Hamlett.

Before: View from the island in September, before cattail removal. ©Nancy Hamlett.

After: View of the lake (with a coot) from the island. Nancy Hamlett.

After: View of the lake (with a coot) from the island. ©Nancy Hamlett.

We also noted the success of one of last week’s deeds. A dead alder had fallen into the cattails on the south shore, and after freeing it from the cattails, the volunteers left in the lake to provide a platform for turtles to bask. And sure enough, this week one was sunning on it:

A Red-Eared Slider basks on the log. Nancy Hamlett.

A Red-Eared Slider basks on the dead alder log. ©Nancy Hamlett.

For the next workday, we will be working on constructing a teaching garden. Join us if you can!

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